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Santos: Our Lady of Guadalupe

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Acoma Pueblo sits atop a 347-foot sandstone mesa 65 miles northeast of Santa Fe. Historically, it is best known for the conflict that occurred in 1598 in which Don Juan de Onate and his Spanish troops overpowered the pueblo and brutally punished the survivors through mass execution, mutilation and enslavement. In the world of art, Acoma is known for its excellent, distinctive pottery that features fluted rims, thin walls and geometric designs.

Acoma artists use slate-like clay, which they temper with pottery sherds. This mixture, when fired in the traditional manner, produces pottery with a light cream, almost white color. The mixture also allows the artist to create pieces with very thin walls.

Contemporary Acoma pottery is dominated by the olla, with a narrow base that gradually widens to the center and narrows again toward the top. Designed to be of fine quality and perfectly symmetrical, Acoma pottery will “ring” when lightly tapped.

Most Acoma pottery is painted typically using red and orange (terracotta) outlined in black. Traditional Acoma designs include rainbow bands, parrots, deer and black and brown motifs with geometric patterns. Acoma artists are known for their fine line   designs. Symbolizing rain, the fine lines are painted close together. Line direction varies in order to create larger geometric patterns.

Currently, some Acoma potters have chosen to use molded unpainted greenware rather than complete the laborious process of building coiled pots. This greenware is decorated in the traditional Acoma fashion. The most famous of contemporary Acoma artists using traditional  methods are Lucy  Lewis and  Marie Chino.

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ACOMA POTTERY – MRM DIGITAL COLLECTION
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This pot is a traditional Acoma olla. Six “Heartline Deer” images grace the center portion. Above and below the deer, fine line, geometric designs dominate the olla. The fine line designs tend to resemble an impressionistic floral design.

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“Our Lady of Guadalupe” is the patron saint of Mexico. Her position in Catholic iconography evolves from a story involving a 57-year-old Aztec convert, Juan Diego, who encountered the Virgin Mary on a hillside in the Tepayac hills in central Mexico. Mary wished to have a church built on the site in order to have a location in which the compassion of Christ could help the inhabitants of New Spain. After two unsuccessful attempts to convince the Bishop-elect, Fray Juan de Zumarraga, that he had actually experienced the miracle of the Virgin Mary, Juan Diego received a sign of her divinity to present to the Bishop. She sent him to collect roses, which she arranged carefully in his cloak, and sent him to see the Bishop. When Juan Diego unfolded the cloak to show the Bishop the roses, instead there was an image of the Virgin Mary inscribed on the material. The Bishop was convinced and a church was built on the spot. Today, it is a cathedral and the most visited religious site in the Western Hemisphere.

Our Lady of Guadalupe is the patron saint of Mexico. She is credited with ending a devastating epidemic that ravaged Mexico City in 1736-1737. She was named Patroness of Mexico City in 1737, and of New Spain in 1746. In addition, her image has been associated with Mexican nationalism, both in during the Revolt of 1810, and the Zapata rebellion of 1914.

Our Lady of Guadalupe is the most important saint, and the most important bulto/santo in the Catholic Church in the Southwest.


OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE – MRM COLLECTION

This bulto was created sometime between 1820 and 1830. It is attributed to Antonio Molleno, a famous early santero. Delicately carved bodies and clothing, expressive white painted faces and dark colors distinguish his work. The figure has 15 mandorlas (sun rays) on each side, a crescent moon at the base on each side, and a crown on her head. Her dress is a deep redish color and the robe is a faded, dark black. While some of the paint has been rubbed off over time, it remains an un-repainted original work.

It is 12.5” high and 6” across with a depth of 2”.

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“Our Lady of Guadalupe” is the patron saint of Mexico. Her position in Catholic iconography evolves from a story involving a 57-year-old Aztec convert, Juan Diego, who encountered the Virgin Mary on a hillside in the Tepayac hills in central Mexico. Mary wished to have a church built on the site in order to have a location in which the compassion of Christ could help the inhabitants of New Spain. After two unsuccessful attempts to convince the Bishop-elect, Fray Juan de Zumarraga, that he had actually experienced the miracle of the Virgin Mary, Juan Diego received a sign of her divinity to present to the Bishop. She sent him to collect roses, which she arranged carefully in his cloak, and sent him to see the Bishop. When Juan Diego unfolded the cloak to show the Bishop the roses, instead there was an image of the Virgin Mary inscribed on the material. The Bishop was convinced and a church was built on the spot. Today, it is a cathedral and the most visited religious site in the Western Hemisphere.

 

Our Lady of Guadalupe is the patron saint of Mexico. She is credited with ending a devastating epidemic that ravaged Mexico City in 1736-1737. She was named Patroness of Mexico City in 1737, and of New Spain in 1746. In addition, her image has been associated with Mexican nationalism, both in during the Revolt of 1810, and the Zapata rebellion of 1914.

 

Our Lady of Guadalupe is the most important saint, and the most important bulto/santo in the Catholic Church in the Southwest.

 

 


 

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE – MRM COLLECTION

 

This bulto was created sometime between 1820 and 1830. It is attributed to Antonio Molleno, a famous early santero. Delicately carved bodies and clothing, expressive white painted faces and dark colors distinguish his work. The figure has 15 mandorlas (sun rays) on each side, a crescent moon at the base on each side, and a crown on her head. Her dress is a deep redish color and the robe is a faded, dark black. While some of the paint has been rubbed off over time, it remains an un-repainted original work.

 

It is 12.5” high and 6” across with a depth of 2”.

Return to Bulto/Santos Main Page

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